FAQ’s

FAQ’s

Digital Conditioners

Q: How do I communicate with the USB device?
A: Using a simple ‘Virtual Com Port’, the DSCUSB communicates as if the device is connected to a serial port. The device addressing allows multiple devices.

Q: Is temperature sensing available on the DSCUSB?
A: An optional temperature sensor module (DTEMP) is available which will enable an advanced 5-point temperature-compensation of measurements.

Q: Is there Linearity compensation in the DSCUSB?
A: Advanced 7-point linearity compensation available as standard.

Q: How stable is the DSCUSB device?
A: 10ppm/°C basic accuracy (equates to 16 bit resolution).

Q: Are there self-diagnostics capabilities?
A: Continuous monitoring on the DSCUSB for faults such as strain overload, over/under-temperature, broken sensors or power failure. All fault warnings are retained on power-fail.

Q:What are the output options of the DSCUSB?
A: We currenly only offer the device in ASCII protocol.

Q: Tell me about DSCUSB low current
A: Functions as a ‘Low Power Device’ i.e. draws less than 100mA (one unit load) when connected to a 350 Ohm Bridge.

Q: How do I communicate with the USB device?
A: Using a simple ‘Virtual Com Port’, the DSCUSB-PT communicates as if the device is connected to a serial port. The device addressing allows up to multiple devices.

Q: Is temperature sensing available on the DSCUSB-PT
A: An optional temperature sensor module (DTEMP) is available which will enable an advanced 5-point temperature-compensation of measurements.

Q: Is there Linearity compensation in the DSCUSB-PT?
A: Advanced 7-point linearity compensation available as standard.

Q: How stable is the DSCUSB-PT device?
A: 10ppm/°C basic accuracy (equates to 16 bit resolution).

Q: Are there self-diagnostics capabilities?
A: Continuous monitoring on the DSCUSB for faults such as over/under-temperature, power failure. All fault warnings are retained on power-fail.

Q: What are the output options of the DSCUSB-PT?
A: We currently only offer the device in ASCII protocol.

Q: Tell me about DSCUSB-PT low current?
A: Functions as a ‘Low Power Device’ i.e. draws less than 100mA (one unit load) when connected to a 500 Ohm load sensor.

Q: Can I use the DSCUSB-PT with my own software?
A: Yes.  The DSCUSB-PT appears as a virtual com port.  The protocol is ASCII and is described in the advanced manual.

Q: Can I check the input of the DSCUSB-PT is working correctly?
A: Yes. There is a 50% reference output on pin 3 of the D-Type connector.  Disconnect the sensor and connect pin 3 to pin 4 of the D-Type connector.  This should give a 50% value of ±1%

Q: How do I communicate with the USB device?
A:  FSU modules can connect to a PC by plugging into a USB port and do not require an external power supply as they appear as a ‘single unit load’ i.e. they draw <100mA.

Appropriate USB drivers must be installed which are automatically installed with the FSU Toolkit software.
Ensure the Toolkit is installed before plugging in the FSU device.

Q: What measurement rate does the FSU operate at?
A: 4800 sps – this is a fixed rate.

Q: How do I calibrate the device?
A: By using the free Toolkit software which is available to download from our website.  It allows configuration, calibration, data recording and review and for parameter management of the modules.

Q: What noise free resolution can I expect from the FSU-SSB?
A: 13 bit resolution, which equates to 1 part in 8000 noise free over a 1 second period.

Q: Are there self-diagnostics capabilities?
A: The module indicates status via a red Healthy LED.  When the FSU is placed in configuration mode the LED will be on solidly.

When the FSU is in recording mode and transmitting data the LED should flash ON for 100ms every 500ms (LED will be OFF but flash on for a tenth of a second every half a second).

If the integrity of the load cell is in doubt the LED will flash OFF for 100ms every 500ms (LED will be ON but flash off for a tenth of a second every half a second).

Q: How do I power the FSU?
A: FSU modules can connect to a PC by plugging into a USB port and do not require an external power supply as they appear as a ‘single unit load’ i.e. they draw <100mA.

Q: How do I get the software for the FSU?
A: The free software is downloadable from the Support section of this site

Q: What is the FSU toolkit used for?
A: The FSU Toolkit is a configuration and analytical tool designed specifically for configuring FSU modules.  This toolkit allows configuration, calibration, data recording and review and for parameter management of the modules.

Q: Can I connect multiple FSU’s?
A: Only one (1) FSU at a time can be connected to a PLC.

Q: Can the FSU be din rail mounted?

A: Yes, a DIN rail mounting kit is available for top hat DIN rail. Optional part DSCUSB-DIN consists of a pair of screws and two DIN rail clips.
Q: What kind of approvals does the FSU have?

A: CE Approvals

European EMC Directive, 2004/108/EC
BS EN 61326-1:2006
BS EN 61326-2-3:2006

Q: What is the warranty period on this device?
A: All FSU products from Mantracourt Electronics Ltd., (‘Mantracourt’) are warranted against defective material and workmanship for a period of three (3) years from the date of dispatch.

Q: What are the dimensions of the cased FSU?
A: 70.5 x 51 x 20mm excluding 9-way ‘D’ type socket connector.
74.5 x 51 x 20mm including connector.

Wireless Telemetry

Q: What is the range of T24?
A: The T24-ACMm which has an integral antenna has a range of 400 metres direct line of sight. The T24-ACM / T24-ACMi uses a integrated PCB T24-ANTA antenna provides up to 800 metres range in ideal conditions. This range can be increased up to two times with the T24-AR (wireless range extender).

Q: What inputs are available to the T24 system?
A: The T24 system supports Strain, Current, Voltage, Temperature, Pulse and Potentiometer transmitters

Q: How reliable are the readings?
A: Due to the digital nature of the T24 system, when a reading is received by any device it is guaranteed not have been distorted over the RF transmission.

Q: What software is provided with the T24 devices?
A: All devices are supported by the T24 Tool Kit which allows users to configure all devices from the T24 range as well as view and log data from transmitters modules in range. The software can also be downloaded directly from our website.

Q: How many devices can operate on one radio channel?
A: Many devices can operate on the same radio channel depending on the sample rate of the transmitter modules present in the system. The radio channel is capable of supporting up to 200 data packets per second.

Q: Can PC software gather data from many devices?
A: Yes, Mantracourt provides freeware for logging up to 100 inputs to one base station, in addition the free Windows DLL and COM driver can be used to gather data through a customer’s own PC software.

Q: What limits the RF range of the devices?
A: Any metal surface will reflect 2.4 GHz radio waves, therefore in a sealed metal box, no RF will escape. However by providing a suitable RF window the signals will propagate out.

Q: What Frequency does the system operate on?
A: Licence free world wide 2.4GHz, although this frequency is used by other equipment, the T24 range has been tested with Bluetooth, Zigbee & WiFi devices without conflicts.

Q: Is it possible to use wireless range extenders within T24 network?
A: The T24-AR wireless range extender which can be added to the system can propagate a signal around corners and obstacles. This unit can also double the effective range.

Q: Is the system point to point?
A: Yes, however the modules may also operate in many to one (such as multiple data transmitters modules communicating with a base station) and one to many (such as a data transmitter module supplying data to multiple handhelds and displays).

Q: What sensors would these inputs cover?
A: Any sensor that provides a voltage, current or ratio metric interface can be connected to an transmitter module, including load cells, inclinometers, accelerometers, displacement LVDT, pressure, potentiometer, pulse, temperature, humidity, ph, shock.

Q: What is the communication protocol?
A: Proprietary protocol based on a 802.15.4 chip. This allows the T24 range to co-exist with Bluetooth, Zigbee & WiFi devices without conflicts.

Q: What are the sampling rates of the transmitter modules?
A: The T24 standard transmitter modules (SA, IA, VA, RA, TA, PA) sample from 0-200 updates/sec. The T24-SA fast transmitter modules are fixed at 2,000 updates/sec.

Q: What is the resolution of the transmitter modules?
A: The noise free resolution for a sample time of 10 milli-seconds or less is 15.5 bits for the T24 SA, 12.5 bits for the T24-VA, 14 bits for the VA and 12.25 bits for the T24IA.

The T24-PA’s accuracy % input error @ 1 Hz is 0.15% and for the T24 RA the accuracy is 0.01% of the full scale.
With increased sample times resolution can be increased up to 18.75 bits for the T24-SA.

Q: What is the supply voltage for the transmitter modules?
A: 3V for the transmitter modules and handheld displays. Other modules in the range take 9-36 V.

Q: How are the modules powered?
A: The ACMm is the smallest module and has a separate battery pack (T24-BB1 using 2 x AAA). The T24-ACMi is the mid size module and provides power via 2 x AA internal batteries. The T24-ACM although larger can provide power from an external power supply (5-18V) as well as 2 x D cell internal batteries which provide a higher battery capacity allowing for longer battery life.

Find out the battery life of your system using our Battery Calculator.

Q: Can power be provided to a sensor?
A: Yes, all transmitter modules feature a 5V supply which is a excitation voltage (with exception of T24-RA which has 2.5V supply).

Q: How is the strain gauge transmitter module calibrated?
A: The modules are factory calibrated to 2.5 mV/V which can be custom calibrated and linearised over up to 9 points by using the T24 Toolkit. The T24-SAf has fixed factory calibration and cannot be linearised.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-SA and T24-SAf?
A: The standard transmitter modules are capable of providing data up to 200 sps. The ‘fast’ T24-SAf provides data at a fixed 2,000 sps.

Q: How many transmitter modules can be acquired by the base stations?
A: Each base station can use one of 16 channels. From that selected channel a base station can collect data simultaneously from any number transmitter modules depending upon the frequency of readings being provided by the transmitter module.

Q: What are the input ranges of the T24 transmitter modules?
A: T24-SA 2.5mV/V calibrated strain gauge based measurement; T24-VA 0-10V, T24-IA 4-20mA, T24-TA pt100 sensor input, T24-RA potentiometer 500 to 100000 Ohms and T24-PA 0.5Hz to 3kHz.

Q: What batteries are required?
A: 2 x AA, Alkaline, Zinc or Rechargeable NiCad, NiMH.

Q: Are they IP or NEMA rated?
A: Yes to IP67

Q: What is the battery life of the handhelds?
A: 40 hours continuous use.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-HS, HA & HR handhelds?
A: The T24-HS provides easy one-to-one communication with a single transmitter module.
The T24-HA advanced provides communication with up to 12 transmitter modules providing both individual and resultant values, as well as the ability to transmit data to other output devices using the F1 function key.
The T24-HR roaming will acquire data from any number of transmitter modules in range, offering the most powerful (nearest) one for display first.

Q: What is the battery life of the handhelds?
A: 40 hours continuous use.

Q: Are they IP or NEMA rated?
A: Yes to IP67

Q: What batteries are required?
A: 2 x AA, Alkaline, Zinc or Rechargeable NiCad, NiMH.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-HS, HA & HR handhelds?
A: The T24-HS provides easy one-to-one communication with a single transmitter module.
The T24-HA advanced provides communication with up to 12 transmitter modules providing both individual and resultant values, as well as the ability to transmit data to other output devices using the F1 function key.
The T24-HR roaming will acquire data from any number of transmitter modules in range, offering the most powerful (nearest) one for display first.

Q: What batteries are required?
A: 2 x AA, Alkaline, Zinc or Rechargeable NiCad, NiMH.

Q: Are they IP or NEMA rated?
A: Yes to IP67

Q: What is the battery life of the handhelds?
A: 40 hours continuous use.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-HS, HA & HR handhelds?
A: The T24-HS provides easy one-to-one communication with a single transmitter module.
The T24-HA advanced provides communication with up to 12 transmitter modules providing both individual and resultant values, as well as the ability to transmit data to other output devices using the F1 function key.
The T24-HR roaming will acquire data from any number of transmitter modules in range, offering the most powerful (nearest) one for display first.

Q: What is the battery life of the handhelds?
A: 40 hours continuous use.

Q: Are they IP or NEMA rated?
A: Yes to IP67

Q: What batteries are required?
A: 2 x AA, Alkaline, Zinc or Rechargeable NiCad, NiMH.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-HS, HA & HR handhelds?
A: The T24-HS provides easy one-to-one communication with a single transmitter module.
The T24-HA advanced provides communication with up to 12 transmitter modules providing both individual and resultant values, as well as the ability to transmit data to other output devices using the F1 function key.
The T24-HR roaming will acquire data from any number of transmitter modules in range, offering the most powerful (nearest) one for display first.

Q: What is the function of the USB and the industrial T24 base stations?
A: Both provide users with a PC interface by which collect data from any transmitter module with in range and configure all devices in the T24 range.

Q: How is the industrial base station different to the USB base station?
A: The industrial base station provides not only USB interface but also RS232 and RS485 at multiple baud rates. This module can also be DIN rail mounted.

Q: How many transmitter modules can be acquired by the base stations?
A: Each base station can use one of 16 channels. From that selected channel a base station can collect data simultaneously from any number transmitter modules depending upon the frequency of readings being provided by the transmitter module.

Q: What is the difference between the T24-SO Serial Output and T24 Base Stations?
A: The T24-SO gathers data from up to 8 transmitter modules and, on its serial output, provides a user configurable ASCII string. The output string can contain the summed value of the gathered data. This output can be used to drive serial displays, printers or to simply feed directly into a PC, PLC or other data transmitter systems.
The base stations communicate bi-directionally so are used to configure the devices as well as gather data. The communications protocol is binary and packet based and so requires processing to present the data to the application in a formatted manner.

Q: How many T24 transmitter modules can be controlled by one USB base station at the same time?
A: Transmitter modules are not controlled when providing data, rather data is provided at a user determined rate during configuration set up. The base station can gather data from any number of transmitter modules providing they are on the same channel. The number of modules a single base station can process depends upon the frequency of transmission from the transmitter modules that channel.

Q: Can base stations integrate to other communications protocols?
A: With the use of the .DLL and COM driver provided with the T24 Tool Kit, users can create tunnelling between the data provided by the base station, to the PC, and another communication protocols.

Q: Once a transmitter module has been configured, will it require regular connections to the base station?
A: No. Once a transmitter module has been configured it will remain stable for its lifetime providing its operating limits are not exceeded.

Control

Q: Does the LCI have a communications output?
A: No

Q: How is the LCI powered?
A: The LCI is powered from the connected instruments excitation supply.

Q: Does the LCI support 5V dc power supply?
A: Yes, the new version now supports 4-12V supply voltage which makes is more usable with modern instruments that supply 5V dc to the strain bridge.

Q: How does the LCI provide fault monitoring?
A: The LCI scans each load cell in turn measuring the mV of each load cell attached this allow for the following conditions to be tested for…
• One or more of the load cells are out of balance with the pre-set error band.
• Any load cell is operating outside its pre-set range
• The load cell excitation voltage drops
• Any of the load cells become open or short circuit
• Internal load cell fault causing bridge imbalance

Faults are flagged by the illumination of the red LED and the drop out of the relay contact.

Q: How many load cells will the LCI connect to?
A: Between 1 and 4

Q: What are the output options of the LCI?
A: There are no options for the LCI

Q: What Mantracourt instruments are compatible with the LCI
A: The following Mantracourt devices or families are compatible with the LCI
ADW15, LCA15, LCA20, LCD20, SMW and SGA

Q: How do I configure the LCI.
A: The LCI is configured using the on board keypad and display. There is a simple single level menu system that is password protected that allow the 5 parameters to be entered.

Q: What is the function of the LED display
A: When the system is healthy and all load cells are operating within the parameters set the display will Display “good”.
If there is an error the display will show the error codes. These codes relate to the load cell(s) causing the fault and an error number indicating what the fault is. Ie “2Er5” indicates load cell 2 has an excitation fault.
The display can also show the average mV value for the configured amount of load cells connected or show the individual mV for each load cell. Refer to manual for operation

Q: How do I use the LCI to signal a fault up-stream in the system?
A: The LCI has a relay contact that is energised when the system is healthy. If a fault is detected the relay is de-energised and the red LED illuminated. It is this relay contact that can be used to indicate a fault to the up-stream system.

Q: What rating is the LCI relay contact?
A: The relay contact rating is 24V dc @ 500mA or 120V ac @ 500mA

Q: What is the warranty period on an LCI?
A: 3 years

Q: What is the IP rating of the LCI”
A: IP65

Q: What is the cable diameter for the 6 cable glands fitted to the LCI
A: The cable diameter for the 6 glands is 4.5mm to 7mm

Q: Is this a summing unit?”
A: Yes, the unit sums the connected load cells. The number of load cells is selectable on the the display.

Q: Can the LCI be used to monitor over/under load?”
A: The max and min mV levels can be set in the range +/- 50 mV and are then applied to each load cell output.

Q: Will the LCI warn if the load cells are out of balance?
A: Yes, the maximum allowed difference between load cell outputs can be set in the +/- 50 mV range.

Q: There are no power connections, why?
A: The LCI uses the excitation voltage that is provided to the load cells.

Q: What are the alarm options?
A: There is an alarm LED on the LCI board that lights up when there is a fault. The display will show the load cell and error type. There is also a relay output to drive an alarm.

Analogue Conditioners

Q: Can the SGA be mounted on a DIN Rail?
A: Yes, the SGA can be mounted on a DIN Rail using a D4 base plate listed as an optional accessory for your SGA.

Q: Does the SGA have shunt calibration?
A: The SGA has an onboard shunt calibration function. This shunts one arm of the connected load cell to produce a known change in the output which can be used for calibration or checking load cell integrity (or associated wiring).

Q: Does the SGA / LVDT lose its calibration if you switch it from 4-20 mA to 0-10 V?
A: Yes

Q: Can the SGA be mounted on a DIN Rail?
A: Yes, the SGA can be mounted on a DIN Rail using a D4 base plate listed as an optional accessory for your SGA.

Q: Does the SGA have shunt calibration?
A: The SGA has an onboard shunt calibration function. This shunts one arm of the connected load cell to produce a known change in the output which can be used for calibration or checking load cell integrity (or associated wiring).

Q: Does the SGA / LVDT lose its calibration if you switch it from 4-20 mA to 0-10 V?
A: Yes

Q: How many load cells can you attach to a ICA?
A: One
Q: Which ICAs can you use with a ILE enclosure?
A: All of them

Handheld

Q: Can I use the handheld to indicate different engineering units?
A: Yes, 2 separate ranges are available, which enable the instrument to read and display two separate engineering units; i.e. lbs/kg, tonne/kN, etc. The menu options provide the user with the ability to completely tailor the operation of each range such as the display update rate, low power operation and RS232 output along with the resolution and decimal point position. Each range tracks its own peak and trough as well as its Gross/Net state all of which are saved on powering.

Q: Can I connect to RS232 using the PSD?
A: Yes, via the PSD232. This handheld can connect to most RS232 interface whether it’s a PC or simple data logger.

The PSD232 sends the displayed value to the RS232 port at 9600 baud in an ASCII format, terminated by a carriage return and line-feed making it suitable for stand alone data loggers, larger serial displays as well as interfacing onto a PC for logging which can provide a useful record during a calibration or load cell test.

The RS232 output is provided at the same time that the display is updated The update rate is user configurable with updates rate of up 10Hz.

Q: How do I calibrate to the PSD?
A: The PSD is factory set to enable calibration with sensors generating an input signal of 5mV/V or less. In the majority of cases it will not be necessary to read higher signal levels.

The best method of calibration, if it is possible to do so, is via the Live calibration (via the PSD’s menu programme), as this reads in the sensor signal at two calibration points and scales the PSD automatically. If this is not possible, then the sensitivity figure (in mV/V) from the sensor calibration certificate can be used to scale the PSD, by using the Table (via the PSD’s menu programme) calibration. This may be the only option available if you are unable to apply a known stimulus to the sensor, which quite often is the case.

Q: What is TEDS and how does it work in the PSD?
A: TEDS is at the heart of the new universally accepted IEEE 1451.4 standard for delivering Plug and Play capabilities to analogue measurement and test instruments. In essence, information in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet provides interfacing devices with the critical sensor calibration information in order to perform accurate and precise measurements every time. TEDS works in a similar way in which USB computer peripherals immediately work as they are connected. TEDS enabled equipment maybe swapped and changed without recalibration, saving time and money. TEDS holds information such as a sensor manufacturer, model and serial numbers, and more importantly all the calibration settings determined by the manufacturer.

As implemented according to IEEE P1451.4, data in the form of a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS) is burned on an Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory (EEPROM) chip located in the sensor or its associated connector. TEDS requires only a single additional connection from the sensor to the Instrument.

The main advantage of the TEDS enabled PSD is that one PSD can read from any number of TEDS enabled strain bridge sensors without the need for the operator to enter calibration data which can be a time consuming and erroneous operation.

Q: Can I connect the handheld to more than one sensor without using TEDS
A: Yes. Although the PSD has only one sensor input it does have two ranges. So the calibration and configuration data for two separate sensors can be held by the PSD. Each range has its own Peak & Trough value as well as tracking if it is in Gross or Net mode.

Q: Can I connect to RS232 using the PSD?
A: Yes, via the PSD232. This handheld can connect to most RS232 interface whether it’s a PC or simple data logger.

The PSD232 sends the displayed value to the RS232 port at 9600 baud in an ASCII format, terminated by a carriage return and line-feed making it suitable for stand alone data loggers, larger serial displays as well as interfacing onto a PC for logging which can provide a useful record during a calibration or load cell test.

The RS232 output is provided at the same time that the display is updated The update rate is user configurable with updates rate of up 10Hz.

Q: Can I use the handheld to indicate different engineering units?
A: Yes, 2 separate ranges are available, which enable the instrument to read and display two separate engineering units; i.e. lbs/kg, tonne/kN, etc. The menu options provide the user with the ability to completely tailor the operation of each range such as the display update rate, low power operation and RS232 output along with the resolution and decimal point position. Each range tracks its own peak and trough as well as its Gross/Net state all of which are saved on powering.

Q: How do I calibrate to the PSD?
A: The PSD is factory set to enable calibration with sensors generating an input signal of 5mV/V or less. In the majority of cases it will not be necessary to read higher signal levels.

The best method of calibration, if it is possible to do so, is via the Live calibration (via the PSD’s menu programme), as this reads in the sensor signal at two calibration points and scales the PSD automatically. If this is not possible, then the sensitivity figure (in mV/V) from the sensor calibration certificate can be used to scale the PSD, by using the Table (via the PSD’s menu programme) calibration. This may be the only option available if you are unable to apply a known stimulus to the sensor, which quite often is the case.

Q: What is TEDS and how does it work in the PSD?
A: TEDS is at the heart of the new universally accepted IEEE 1451.4 standard for delivering Plug and Play capabilities to analogue measurement and test instruments. In essence, information in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet provides interfacing devices with the critical sensor calibration information in order to perform accurate and precise measurements every time. TEDS works in a similar way in which USB computer peripherals immediately work as they are connected. TEDS enabled equipment maybe swapped and changed without recalibration, saving time and money. TEDS holds information such as a sensor manufacturer, model and serial numbers, and more importantly all the calibration settings determined by the manufacturer.

As implemented according to IEEE P1451.4, data in the form of a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS) is burned on an Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory (EEPROM) chip located in the sensor or its associated connector. TEDS requires only a single additional connection from the sensor to the Instrument.

The main advantage of the TEDS enabled PSD is that one PSD can read from any number of TEDS enabled strain bridge sensors without the need for the operator to enter calibration data which can be a time consuming and erroneous operation.

Q: Can I connect the handheld to more than one sensor without using TEDS
A: Yes. Although the PSD has only one sensor input it does have two ranges. So the calibration and configuration data for two separate sensors can be held by the PSD. Each range has its own Peak & Trough value as well as tracking if it is in Gross or Net mode.

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